Category Archives: Child fashion

Dare To Wear Love – World MasterCard Fashion Week – The Tent at David Pecault Square – March 16, 2012

Dare To Wear Love - World MasterCard Fashion Week – The Tent at David Pecault Square – March 16, 2012

The Closing Night Gala of World MasterCard Fashion Week celebrates the fashion design community’s talents and commitment to social justice.

Dare To Wear Love is a high energy, massively entertaining show featuring gorgeous one of a kind fashions by Canadian designers, celebrity models, musicians and dancers.

Presented by Hoax Couture, BMO Financial Group and the FDCC, the event raises funds and awareness for the Stephen Lewis Foundation: Using The Power of Fashion for Good.

THE STEPHEN LEWIS FOUNDATION puts money directly into the hands of grassroots organizations in Africa that are turning the tide on the AIDS pandemic in ways that are innovative, sophisticated and impactful.

DARE TO WEAR LOVE is the creation of Hoax Couture designers and founders, Chris Tyrell and Jim Searle. Inspired by the resilience of African grandmothers raising children orphaned by AIDS, Jim and Chris invited twenty-five of Canada’s top fashion designers to take part in Dare To Wear Love by showcasing an outfit made with 6 yards of African fabric.

Dare To Wear Love at World MasterCard Fashion Week.

DESIGNERS INVOLVED:

Lida Baday, Brian Bailey, David Dixon, Paul Hardy, Greta Constantine, Izzy Camilleri, Adrian Wu, Rod Philpott for Shkank INC., Hoax Couture, Linda Lundstrom, Farley Chatto, Aileen Ng for Avioanni, Kingi Carpenter for Peach Berserk, Zoran Dobric, Cydelic by Choryin, Marty Rotman, Lovas by Wesley Badanjnak, Ines DiSanto, Rory Lindo and Kelly Freedman for Damzels in This Dress, Pat McDonagh, Pam Chorley for Fashion Crimes, Jason Meyers, Thomas Chung, Tina Ou

daretowearlove.com
twitter.com/daretowearlove

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World MasterCard Fashion Week or WMCFW, formerly known as LG Fashion Week is an event held in Toronto, Canada in March (for fall/winter collections) and in October (for spring/summer collections). It is the biggest fashion week held in Canada and it is the second largest fashion week in North America after New York.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LG_Fashion_Week
twitter.com/WMCFashionWeek
#WMCFashionWeek

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Photography by Jason Hargrove

jasonhargrove.com
twitter.com/jasonhargrove

This collection is available with a Creative Commons Non-Commercial Attribution use for media and bloggers alike. Just credit me and you’re set.

High resolution commercial use licenses can be purchased on request :))

Posted by Jason Hargrove on 2012-03-28 22:17:45

Tagged: , World MasterCard Fashion Week , WMCFW , Mastercard , Toronto , Dare To Wear Love

Halsman, Philippe (1906-1979) – 1948 Elizabeth Taylor

Halsman, Philippe (1906-1979) - 1948 Elizabeth Taylor

From the 1940s through the 1970s, Philippe Halsman’s sparkling portraits of celebrities, intellectuals, and politicians appeared on the covers and pages of the big picture magazines, including Look, Esquire, the Saturday Evening Post, Paris Match, and especially Life. His work also appeared in advertisements and publicity for clients like Elizabeth Arden cosmetics, NBC, Simon & Schuster, and Ford. Photographers, amateur as well as professional, admired Halsman’s stunning images. In 1958, a poll conducted by Popular Photography named Halsman one of the "World’s Ten Greatest Photographers" along with Irving Penn, Richard Avedon, Ansel Adams, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Alfred Eisenstaedt, Ernst Haas, Yousuf Karsh, Gjon Mili, and Eugene Smith. Altogether, Halsman’s images form a vivid picture of prosperous American society in the middle years of the twentieth century. "Philippe Halsman: A Retrospective" is the first historical survey of his work.

Philippe Halsman (1906-1979) was born in Riga, Latvia. He studied engineering in Dresden before moving to Paris, where he set up his photographic studio in 1932. Halsman’s bold, spontaneous style won him many admirers. His portraits of actors and authors appeared on book jackets and in magazines; he worked with fashion (especially hat designs), and filled commissions for private clients. By 1936, Halsman was known as one of the best portrait photographers in France.

Halsman’s career came to a dramatic halt in the summer of 1940, when Hitler’s troops invaded Paris. His wife, daughter, sister, and brother-in-law, who all held French passports, immigrated to America, but as a Latvian citizen, Philippe Halsman could not obtain a visa. For several long months he waited in Marseilles along with many others who were forced to escape fascist Europe. Finally, through the intervention of Albert Einstein (who had met Halsman’s sister in the 1920s), Halsman obtained permission to enter the United States, and he arrived in New York in November 1940 with little more than his camera.

Halsman’s big break came when he met Connie Ford, a striking young model who agreed to pose in exchange for prints for her portfolio. When publicists at Elizabeth Arden saw Halsman’s photograph of Ford against an American flag, they used the image to launch a national campaign for "Victory Red" lipstick. A year later, in the fall of 1942, Life asked Halsman to shoot a story on new hat design. To Halsman’s delight, his portrait of the model smiling through a feathery brim landed on the cover. One hundred more covers followed before the magazine ceased weekly publication in 1972.

When Halsman began working for Life, the magazine was only six years old, and photojournalism was still a new field. Before the existence of Life and its competitors, Americans learned about the world from newspapers, radio, and newsreels. But the new picture magazines published pages filled with bright, dramatic photographs, bringing Americans vivid information that no other media could match. In the spirit of a variety show, or a world’s fair, magazines combined stories about international politics, everyday life, news events, celebrities, exotic scenery, and humor to prove that "so much of the world, so judiciously selected, had never been seen before in one place." Today, to understand the significance of those great magazines, we need only look at the many forms of mass media that have come to replace them. Now, we find photographs on television and billboards; in special publications devoted to news, people, fashion, or sports; in newspapers; in museums and galleries; and on the Internet. And, ironically, the more places there are to see photographs, the harder it is to attract viewers. But in 1942, when Philippe Halsman’s portrait simply appeared on the cover of Life and immediately reached a large, united audience.

Surrealism

In Paris, Halsman studied the work of other artists and photographers, especially the surrealists, from whom he learned to make images that surprised his viewers. By including homely, and ultimately disturbing, details, he gave his subjects memorable tension. Through subtle lighting, sharp focus, and close cropping, he turned formal fashion shots into serious investigations of character. When Halsman posed NBC comedians against bare white paper, eliminating all defining context, their isolation made them look both frail and funny. Most important of all, from the surrealists’ exploration of the erotic unconscious, Halsman learned how to combine glamour, sex, and wholesome energy in one portrait. This unusual ability made him Life’s favorite photographer for sensual stars like Marilyn Monroe and Brigitte Bardot. Halsman’s sympathy for surrealism also led to his long, productive friendship with Salvador Dali. Halsman met Dali on assignment in 1941, and over the next three decades they became partners on many projects, including a series of playful tableaux that had all the disturbing irrationality of dreams or a painting by Dali. Their most notable production was "Dali Atomicus", in which the artist, his canvas, furniture, cats, and water all appear suspended in air.

Psychological Portraiture

Over the course of his career, Halsman enjoyed comparing his work to that of a good psychologist who regards his subjects with special insight. With his courtly manners and European accent, Halsman also fit the popular stereotype at a time when Americans regarded psychology with fascinated skepticism. In fact, Halsman was proud of his ability to reveal the character of his sitters. As he explained, "It can’t be done by pushing the person into position or arranging his head at a certain angle. It must be accomplished by provoking the victim, amusing him with jokes, lulling him with silence, or asking impertinent questions which his best friend would be afraid to voice."

In the spring of 1952, Halsman put his signature technique to work when Life sent him to Hollywood to photograph Marilyn Monroe. Halsman asked Monroe to stand in a corner, and placed his camera directly in front of her. Later, he recalled that she looked "as if she had been pushed into the corner cornered with no way to escape." Then Halsman, his assistant, and Life’s reporter staged a "fiery" competition for Monroe’s attention. "Surrounded by three admiring men she smiled, flirted, giggled and wriggled with delight. During the hour I kept her cornered she enjoyed herself royally, and I . . . took between 40 and 50 pictures."

In this widely familiar portrait, Monroe wears a white evening gown and stands with her back against two walls, one dark, the other light, her eyes half closed and her dark, lipsticked mouth partly open. Yet Halsman deftly avoided any explicit representation of the true subject of the picture. Using the euphemistic language of the time, Halsman’s assistant admired the photographer’s ability to make "suggestive" pictures of beautiful women which still showed "good taste," emphasizing "expression" rather than "physical assets." And then the assistant added, "Halsman is very adept at provoking the expression he wants."

Jumpology

In 1950, NBC asked Halsman to photograph many of its popular comedians. Milton Berle, Ed Wynn, Sid Caesar, Groucho Marx, Bob Hope, Red Skelton, and many others came to Halsman’s studio, where they performed while he captured their antics on film. A single session could generate two or three hundred pictures. When Halsman compared these comic images to more traditional portraits, he found that comedians often jumped and always stayed in character. Desperation (and good humor) finally drove him to ask others to jump for his camera when the Ford Motor Company commissioned him to make an official family photograph in honor of the company’s fiftieth anniversary. Halsman spent a long, tiring session with nine edgy adults and eleven restless children. Afterward, Halsman’s irrepressible humor inspired him to ask matriarch Mrs. Edsel Ford, "May I take a picture of you jumping?’" The astonished Mrs. Ford replied, "You want me to jump with my high heels?" Next, her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Henry Ford II, requested a turn. The "jump" pictures had surprising charm, and over the next six years, Halsman asked many clients to jump for him. Van Cliburn, Edward R. Murrow, and Herbert Hoover declined Halsman’s invitation, but most people realized they had nothing to lose. (Some gained considerably, like the suddenly buoyant and likable Vice President Richard Nixon, who jumped for Halsman in the White House.) Halsman claimed the jumps revealed character that was otherwise hidden. "When you ask a person to jump, his attention is mostly directed toward the act of jumping and the mask falls so that the real person appears."

Halsman also pursued this project to discover something about himself. "I assure you that often, before approaching the person, my heart would beat, and I would have to fight down all my inhibitions in order to address this request to my subject. At every time when the subject agreed to jump, it was for me like a kind of victory." How did Halsman persuade so many to abandon their composure for his camera? Somehow, he managed to convince each one that the risk was all his own.

Like many who escaped Hitler’s Europe, Philippe Halsman rarely discussed the past. He rightly insisted that his most important work took place in America, and in many ways his adopted country became his subject. One typical review noted his patriotic flair, praising Halsman’s "unsanctimonious and immensely intense portrayal of American bounce." From a historian’s perspective, it seems clear that Halsman invented a glowing image of the nation as he saw it, using light, persuasion, nerve, imagination, psychology, and experience. This place and these faces are his creation.

Halsman’s perpetual quest for hidden truth also recalls his personal history as an artist and a refugee. Halsman knew that the effort to establish one’s identity had significance far beyond the needs of the celebrity marketplace. "This fascination with the human face has never left me. . . . Every face I see seems to hide and sometimes, fleetingly, to reveal the mystery of another human being. . . . Capturing this revelation became the goal and passion of my life."

Mary Panzer
Curator of Photographs
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution

Posted by RasMarley on 2012-12-26 01:50:36

Tagged: , halsman , philippe halsman , 1948 , 1940s , 20th century , american , latvian , photographer , portrait , elizabeth taylor , liz taylor

DSC_8640

DSC_8640

Opulence by Elaine Jackson fashion show production is about "Self Empowerment". The fashion show allows men, women and children of all ages and sizes to show that they are beautiful and confident. The fashion show is a fun experience for both the models and audience and is done with style. Join us for live entertainment, fun, fashion and empowerment.

Vendors will be present during intermission for purchases of clothing, accessories, and other products. Most accept cash only.

Some of the proceeds from the show will be donated to local Veterans, Domestic Violence Against Women and Children organizations, and the Austin Foundation.

Posted by prophotobomb on 2017-06-16 19:51:48

Tagged: , fashion

MISSONI (Official Runway Photos) – Milano Moda Donna / Milan Fashion Week SS14 Spring Summer 2014 – #MFW – September 22, 2013 – Photos distributed by Mainstream, via Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana

MISSONI (Official Runway Photos) – Milano Moda Donna / Milan Fashion Week SS14 Spring Summer 2014 – #MFW – September 22, 2013 – Photos distributed by Mainstream, via Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana

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Missoni at Milano Moda Donna / Milan Fashion Week
Official Runway Photos

████████████ DESIGNER

Missoni is an Italian fashion house based in Varese, and known for its colourful knitwear designs. The company was founded by Ottavio ("Tai") and Rosita Missoni in 1953.

Tied to the aesthetic innovation and technical invention that have always changed the identity of knitwear, Missoni is one of the best known, loved and recognized fashion and design brands in the world. Missoni style is the result of a partnership between two people. Tai and Rosita decided to set up a knitwear business in the sixties, and were soon at the cutting edge of Italian fashion. Missoni inaugurated and affirmed an unmistakable way of dressing and living: with a colorful “put-together” of zigzag motifs, stripes, waves and slub yarns in a patchwork of geometric and floral jacquard. The couple started a family and their children Vittorio, Luca and Angela, the brand’s creative director since 1996, grew up in direct contact with their parents’ work. Closely involved with the business, they took on increasingly responsible roles, becoming co-creators in a project that continues to seduce and excite today. Missoni is now one of the best representatives of Italian fashion and design excellence around the world. With its pioneering multicolored aesthetic vision, it continues to influence the contemporary lifestyle, thanks also to the success of the Missoni Home line inaugurated in Edinburgh and Kuwait City at the Missoni Hotels.

missoni.com

twitter.com/Missoni

████████████ EVENT

Milano Moda Donna / Milan Fashion Week

Milan Fashion Week is owned by Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana (The National Chamber for Italian Fashion), a non-profit association which disciplines, co-ordinates and promotes the development of Italian Fashion and is responsible for hosting the fashion events and shows of Milan. The Camera Sindacale della Moda Italiana, was set up on 11 June 1958. This was the forerunner of the body which subsequently became the Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana. Proprietors of the most important haute couture establishments in Italy, including some private establishments, which, in those days, played a crucial role in the promotion of this sector, were present at the Memorandum of Association: Maria Antonelli, Roberto Cappucci, Princess Caracciolo Ginnetti, Alberto Fagiani, Giovanni Cesare Guidi, Germana Marucelli, Emilio Federico Schuberth, Simonetta Colonna Di Cesarò, Jole Veneziani, Francesco Borrello, Giovanni Battista Giorgini and the lawyer Pietro Parisio.
The events dedicated to women’s fashion are the most important (Womenswear / Milan SS Women Ready to Wear, and Milano Moda Donna being the major fashion shows). The summer events dedicated to men include Menswear and Milano Moda Uomo.

Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana

The Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana (The National Chamber for Italian Fashion) is the non profit making Association which disciplines, co-ordinates and promotes the development of Italian Fashion.

The Association represents all the highest cultural values of Italian Fashion. It aims to protect, co-ordinate and strengthen its image, both in Italy and abroad.

In accordance with the statutory provisions, the Association is the point of reference, as well as the preferential mouthpiece, for all the national and international initiatives aimed at valuing and promoting Italian style, customs and Fashion.

Right from the year of its foundation, in 1958, the Association has pursued a policy of organisational support aimed at the knowledge, promotion and development of Fashion through events with a highly intellectual image in Italy and abroad.

Recent agreements over international calendars, which have led to the signing of the Italian-French agreement, have given Milan and the Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana the role of undisputed protagonist on the international fashion scene, thus also contributing to the consolidation of alliances with London and New York.

The Franco-Italian Protocol signed in Paris on 26th June 2000 is founded on the strong will by Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana and Fédération Française du prêt-à-porter Féminin to implement a common policy aimed at developing and circulating luxury products in non-European areas.

On January 17th 2005, this agreement has been reconfirmed in Milan with the signature of a new protocol, in presence of the French Minister of foreign trade, On. François Loos and of the Vice-Minister, On.Adolfo Urso, countersigned by the President of Lombardy Region, On.Roberto Formigoni, with the integration of new initiatives particularly relevant, in order to manage the new scenery of the international trade, characterized by the increasing competition that will get worse and worse at the end of the Multifibre Worldwide Agreement.

cameramoda.it

twitter.com/cameramoda

████████████ PUBLICITY

Photos courtesy of
Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana
cameramoda.it
twitter.com/cameramoda

████████████ Mainstre.am

Mainstream makes images available to the independent press, the mainstream press, open media such as Flickr, Creative Commons, and Wikipedia.

We will soon launch with a service for content creators, publicists, and publishers around the world.

mainstre.am

████████████ Contact

Questions can be sent to:

Tamara McCartney (Assistant Producer)
twitter.com/tamaramccartney

and

Jason Hargrove (Founder)
twitter.com/jasonhargrove
jasonhargrove.com

Posted by goMainstream on 2013-09-30 18:42:21

Tagged: , MISSONI , Milan , MILANO , MILANFASHIONWEEK , MILANOMODADONNA , moda , fashion , Fashionable , FASHION WEEK , models , WOMEN , womens , Ready To Wear , RTW , RTW 14 , 2014 , SS14 , SETTIMANADELLAMODA , ITALIA , collection , RUNWAY , CATWALK , Primavera-Estate , SPRING SUMMER 2014

MISSONI (Official Runway Photos) – Milano Moda Donna / Milan Fashion Week SS14 Spring Summer 2014 – #MFW – September 22, 2013 – Photos distributed by Mainstream, via Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana

MISSONI (Official Runway Photos) – Milano Moda Donna / Milan Fashion Week SS14 Spring Summer 2014 – #MFW – September 22, 2013 – Photos distributed by Mainstream, via Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana

██████████████████████████████████

Missoni at Milano Moda Donna / Milan Fashion Week
Official Runway Photos

████████████ DESIGNER

Missoni is an Italian fashion house based in Varese, and known for its colourful knitwear designs. The company was founded by Ottavio ("Tai") and Rosita Missoni in 1953.

Tied to the aesthetic innovation and technical invention that have always changed the identity of knitwear, Missoni is one of the best known, loved and recognized fashion and design brands in the world. Missoni style is the result of a partnership between two people. Tai and Rosita decided to set up a knitwear business in the sixties, and were soon at the cutting edge of Italian fashion. Missoni inaugurated and affirmed an unmistakable way of dressing and living: with a colorful “put-together” of zigzag motifs, stripes, waves and slub yarns in a patchwork of geometric and floral jacquard. The couple started a family and their children Vittorio, Luca and Angela, the brand’s creative director since 1996, grew up in direct contact with their parents’ work. Closely involved with the business, they took on increasingly responsible roles, becoming co-creators in a project that continues to seduce and excite today. Missoni is now one of the best representatives of Italian fashion and design excellence around the world. With its pioneering multicolored aesthetic vision, it continues to influence the contemporary lifestyle, thanks also to the success of the Missoni Home line inaugurated in Edinburgh and Kuwait City at the Missoni Hotels.

missoni.com

twitter.com/Missoni

████████████ EVENT

Milano Moda Donna / Milan Fashion Week

Milan Fashion Week is owned by Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana (The National Chamber for Italian Fashion), a non-profit association which disciplines, co-ordinates and promotes the development of Italian Fashion and is responsible for hosting the fashion events and shows of Milan. The Camera Sindacale della Moda Italiana, was set up on 11 June 1958. This was the forerunner of the body which subsequently became the Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana. Proprietors of the most important haute couture establishments in Italy, including some private establishments, which, in those days, played a crucial role in the promotion of this sector, were present at the Memorandum of Association: Maria Antonelli, Roberto Cappucci, Princess Caracciolo Ginnetti, Alberto Fagiani, Giovanni Cesare Guidi, Germana Marucelli, Emilio Federico Schuberth, Simonetta Colonna Di Cesarò, Jole Veneziani, Francesco Borrello, Giovanni Battista Giorgini and the lawyer Pietro Parisio.
The events dedicated to women’s fashion are the most important (Womenswear / Milan SS Women Ready to Wear, and Milano Moda Donna being the major fashion shows). The summer events dedicated to men include Menswear and Milano Moda Uomo.

Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana

The Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana (The National Chamber for Italian Fashion) is the non profit making Association which disciplines, co-ordinates and promotes the development of Italian Fashion.

The Association represents all the highest cultural values of Italian Fashion. It aims to protect, co-ordinate and strengthen its image, both in Italy and abroad.

In accordance with the statutory provisions, the Association is the point of reference, as well as the preferential mouthpiece, for all the national and international initiatives aimed at valuing and promoting Italian style, customs and Fashion.

Right from the year of its foundation, in 1958, the Association has pursued a policy of organisational support aimed at the knowledge, promotion and development of Fashion through events with a highly intellectual image in Italy and abroad.

Recent agreements over international calendars, which have led to the signing of the Italian-French agreement, have given Milan and the Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana the role of undisputed protagonist on the international fashion scene, thus also contributing to the consolidation of alliances with London and New York.

The Franco-Italian Protocol signed in Paris on 26th June 2000 is founded on the strong will by Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana and Fédération Française du prêt-à-porter Féminin to implement a common policy aimed at developing and circulating luxury products in non-European areas.

On January 17th 2005, this agreement has been reconfirmed in Milan with the signature of a new protocol, in presence of the French Minister of foreign trade, On. François Loos and of the Vice-Minister, On.Adolfo Urso, countersigned by the President of Lombardy Region, On.Roberto Formigoni, with the integration of new initiatives particularly relevant, in order to manage the new scenery of the international trade, characterized by the increasing competition that will get worse and worse at the end of the Multifibre Worldwide Agreement.

cameramoda.it

twitter.com/cameramoda

████████████ PUBLICITY

Photos courtesy of
Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana
cameramoda.it
twitter.com/cameramoda

████████████ Mainstre.am

Mainstream makes images available to the independent press, the mainstream press, open media such as Flickr, Creative Commons, and Wikipedia.

We will soon launch with a service for content creators, publicists, and publishers around the world.

mainstre.am

████████████ Contact

Questions can be sent to:

Tamara McCartney (Assistant Producer)
twitter.com/tamaramccartney

and

Jason Hargrove (Founder)
twitter.com/jasonhargrove
jasonhargrove.com

Posted by goMainstream on 2013-09-30 18:42:14

Tagged: , MISSONI , Milan , MILANO , MILANFASHIONWEEK , MILANOMODADONNA , moda , fashion , Fashionable , FASHION WEEK , models , WOMEN , womens , Ready To Wear , RTW , RTW 14 , 2014 , SS14 , SETTIMANADELLAMODA , ITALIA , collection , RUNWAY , CATWALK , Primavera-Estate , SPRING SUMMER 2014

Portrait photography or portraiture is a photography of a person or group of people that displays the expression, personality, and mood of the subject.

Portrait photography or portraiture is a photography of a person or group of people that displays the expression, personality, and mood of the subject.

Up The Banner Photography , Noel Moore.

Copyright © All Rights Reserved.
Images are the property of Up The Banner Photography
and may not be reproduced without permission.

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Portrait photography or portraiture is a photography of a person or group of people that displays the expression, personality, and mood of the subject. Like other types of portraiture, the focus of the photograph is usually the person’s face, although the entire body and the background may be included.

History

Portrait photography has been around since the invention and popularization of the camera. The relatively low cost of the daguerreotype in the middle of the 19th century led to its popularity for portraiture. The style of these early works reflected the technical challenges associated with long exposure times and the painterly aesthetic of the time. Subjects were generally seated against plain backgrounds and lit with the soft light of an overhead window and whatever else could be reflected with mirrors. Advances in photographic equipment and techniques developed, gave photographers the ability to capture images with shorter exposure times and allowed photographers to take portrait outside of a studio.
[edit] Lighting for portraiture
Winter portrait of a 10-month old baby girl

When portrait photographs are composed and captured in a studio, the professional photographer has control over the lighting of the composition of the subject and can adjust direction and intensity. There are many ways to light a subject’s face, but there are several common lighting plans which are easy enough to describe.
[edit] Three-Point Lighting

One of the most basic lighting plans is called three-point lighting. This plan uses three (and sometimes four) lights to fully model (bring out details and the three-dimensionality of) the subject’s features. The three main lights used in this light plan are as follows:
[edit] The Key light

Also called a main light, the key light is usually placed to one side of the subject’s face, between 30 and 60 degrees off center and a bit higher than eye level. The key light is the brightest light in the lighting plan.
[edit] The Fill light

Placed opposite the key light, the fill light fills in or softens the shadows on the opposite side of the face. The brightness of the fill light is usually between 1/3 and 1/4 that of the key light. This is expressed as a ratio as in 3:1 or 4:1. When the ratio is 3:1 this is sometimes called Kodak lighting since this was the ratio suggested by Kodak in the instructional booklets accompanying the company’s early cameras.

The purpose of these two lights is to mimic the natural light created by placing a subject in a room near a window. The daylight falling on the subject through the window is the Key light and the Fill light is reflected light coming from the walls of the room. This type of lighting can be found in the works of hundreds of classical painters and early photographers and is often called Rembrandt lighting.
[edit] The Back light

Also called a rim light or hair light, the rim light (the third main light in the three-point lighting plan) is placed behind the subject, out of the picture frame, and often rather higher than the Key light or Fill. The point of the rim light is to provide separation from the background by highlighting the subject’s shoulders and hair. The rim light should be just bright enough to provide separation from the background, but not as bright as the key light.

Sometimes the rim light is set just off to the side, on the fill light side. This can add edge detail to the shadowed side of your model’s face. This can add the effect of having a kicker light using only the three basis lights of three point lighting.
[edit] The Kicker

The "fourth light" in three point lighting, a kicker is a small light, often heavily gobo-ed, snooted or barn doored to limit its coverage, that adds a bright edge light on the fill light side of your model’s face. The placement and brightness of a kicker is a matter of taste and technique. A kicker can also a light used to kick start another light.
[edit] Butterfly lighting

Butterfly lighting uses only two lights. The Key light is placed directly in front of the subject, often above the camera or slightly to one side, and a bit higher than is common for a three-point lighting plan. The second light is a rim light. Often a reflector is placed below the subject’s face to provide fill light and soften shadows.

This lighting can be recognized by the strong light falling on the forehead, the bridge of the nose and the upper cheeks, and by the distinct shadow below the nose which often looks rather like a butterfly and thus provides the name for this lighting plan. Butterfly lighting was a favourite of famed Hollywood portraitist George Hurrell which is why this style of lighting is often called Paramount lighting.
[edit] Accessory lights

These lights can be added to basic lighting plans to provide additional highlights or add background definition.
[edit] The Kicker

A kicker is a small light, often made directional through the use of a snoot, umbrella, or softbox. The kicker is designed to add highlights to the off side of the subject’s face, usually just enough to establish the jaw line or edge of an ear. The kicker should thus be a bit brighter than the fill light, but not so bright it over fills the off side of the face. Many portraitists choose not to use a kicker and settle for the three main lights of the standard plans.
[edit] Background lights

Not so much a part of the portrait lighting plan, but rather designed to provide illumination for the background behind the subject, background lights can pick out details in the background, provide a halo effect by illuminating a portion of a backdrop behind the subject’s head, or turn the background pure white by filling it with light.
[edit] Other lighting equipment

Most lights used in modern photography are a flash of some sort. The lighting for portraiture is typically diffused by bouncing it from the inside of an umbrella, or by using a soft box. A soft box is a fabric box, encasing a photo strobe head, one side of which is made of translucent fabric. This provides a softer lighting for portrait work and is often considered more appealing than the harsh light often cast by open strobes. Hair and background lights are usually not diffused. It is more important to control light spillage to other areas of the subject. Snoots, barn doors and flags or gobos help focus the lights exactly where the photographer wants them. Background lights are sometimes used with color gels placed in front of the light to create coloured backgrounds.
[edit] Windowlight Portraiture
Window light used to create soft light to the portrait

Windows as a source of light for portraits have been used for decades before artificial sources of light were discovered. According to Arthur Hammond, amateur and professional photographers need only two things to light a portrait: a window and a reflector.[1] Although window light limits options in portrait photography compared to artificial lights it gives ample room for experimentation for amateur photographers. A white reflector placed to reflect light into the darker side of the subject’s face, will even the contrast. Shutter speeds may be slower than normal, requiring the use of a tripod, but the lighting will be beautifully soft and rich.[2]

The best time to take window light portrait is considered to be early hours of the day and late hours of afternoon when light is more intense on the window. Curtains, reflectors, and intensity reducing shields are used to give soft light. While mirrors and glasses can be used for high key lighting. At times colored glasses, filters and reflecting objects can be used to give the portrait desired color effects. The composition of shadows and soft light gives window light portraits a distinct effect different from portraits made from artificial lights.

While using window light, the positioning of the camera can be changed to give the desired effects. Such as positioning the camera behind the subject can produce a silhouette of the individual while being adjacent to the subject give a combination of shadows and soft light. And facing the subject from the same point of light source will produce high key effects with least shadows.
[edit] Styles of portraiture

There are many different techniques for portrait photography. Often it is desirable to capture the subject’s eyes and face in sharp focus while allowing other less important elements to be rendered in a soft focus. At other times, portraits of individual features might be the focus of a composition such as the hands, eyes or part of the subject’s torso.

Additionally another style such as head shot has came out of the portraiture technique and had become a style on its own.
[edit] Approaches to Portraiture

There are essentially four approaches that can be taken in photographic portraiture — the constructionist, environmental, candid and creative approaches. Each approach has been used over time for different reasons be they technical, artistic or cultural. The constructionist approach is when the photographer in their portraiture constructs an idea around the portrait — happy family, romantic couple, trustworthy executive. It is the approach used in most studio and social photography. It is also used extensively in advertising and marketing when an idea has to be put across. The environmental approach depicts the subject in their environment be that a work, leisure, social or family one. They are often shown as doing something, a teacher in a classroom, an artist in a studio, a child in a playground. With the environmental approach more is revealed about the subject. Environmental pictures can have good historical and social significance as primary sources of information. The candid approach is where people are photographed without their knowledge going about their daily business. Whilst this approach taken by the paparazzi is criticized and frowned upon for obvious reasons, less invasive and exploitative candid photography has given the world superb and important images of people in various situations and places over the last century. The images of Parisians by Doisneau and Cartier-Bresson to name but two, demonstrate this. As with environmental photography, candid photography is important as a historical source of information about people. The Creative Approach is where digital manipulation (and formerly darkroom manipulation) is brought to bear to produce wonderful pictures of people. It is becoming a major form of portraiture as these techniques become more widely understood and used.
[edit] Lenses

Lenses used in portrait photography are classically fast, medium telephoto lenses, though any lens may be used, depending on artistic purposes. See Canon EF Portrait Lenses for Canon lenses in this style; other manufacturers feature similar ranges. The first dedicated portrait lens was the Petzval lens developed in 1840 by Joseph Petzval. It had a relatively narrow field of view of 30 degrees, a focal length of 150mm, and a fast f-number in the f/3.3-3.7 range.

Classic focal length is in the range 80–135mm on 135 film format and about 150-400mm on large format, which historically is first in photography. Such a field of view provides a flattering perspective distortion when the subject is framed to include their head and shoulders. Wider angle lenses (shorter focal length) require that the portrait be taken from closer (for an equivalent field size), and the resulting perspective distortion yields a relatively larger nose and smaller ears, which is considered unflattering and imp-like. Wide-angle lenses – or even fisheye lenses – may be used for artistic effect, especially to produce a grotesque image. Conversely, longer focal lengths yield greater flattening because they are used from further away. This makes communication difficult and reduces rapport. They may be used, however, particularly in fashion photography, but longer lengths require a loudspeaker or walkie-talkie to communicate with the model or assistants.[3] In this range, the difference in perspective distortion between 85mm and 135mm is rather subtle; see (Castleman 2007) for examples and analysis.

Speed-wise, fast lenses (wide aperture) are preferred, as these allow shallow depth of field (blurring the background), which helps isolate the subject from the background and focus attention on them. This is particularly useful in the field, where one does not have a back drop behind the subject, and the background may be distracting. The details of bokeh in the resulting blur are accordingly also a consideration. However, extremely wide apertures are less frequently used, because they have a very shallow depth of field and thus the subject’s face will not be completely in focus.[4] Thus, f/1.8 or f/2 is usually the maximum aperture used; f/1.2 or f/1.4 may be used, but the resulting defocus may be considered a special effect – the eyes will be sharp, but the ears and nose will be soft.

Conversely, in environmental portraits, where the subject is shown in their environment, rather than isolated from it, background blur is less desirable and may be undesirable, and wider angle lenses may be used to show more context.[5]

Finally, soft focus (spherical aberration) is sometimes a desired effect, particularly in glamour photography where the "gauzy" look may be considered flattering. The Canon EF 135mm f/2.8 with Softfocus is an example of a lens designed with a controllable amount of soft focus.

Most often a prime lens will be used, both because the zoom is not necessary for posed shots (and primes are lighter, cheaper, faster, and higher quality), and because zoom lenses can introduce highly unflattering geometric distortion (barrel distortion or pincushion distortion). However, zoom lenses may be used, particularly in candid shots or to encourage creative framing.[6]

Portrait lenses are often relatively inexpensive, because they can be built simply, and are close to the normal range. The cheapest portrait lenses are normal lenses (50mm), used on a cropped sensor. For example, the Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II is the least expensive Canon lens, but when used on a 1.6× cropped sensor yields an 80mm equivalent focal length, which is at the wide end of portrait lenses.

Posted by upthebanner on 2012-04-09 11:24:13

Tagged: , adult , attractive , background , beautiful , beauty , black , brown , caucasian , cute , elegance , elegant , face , fashion , female , fun , girl , glamour , green , hair , hand , happy , healthy , hot , human , isolated , lady , long , looking , makeup , model , mouth , nails , natural , one , only , people , person , portrait , posing , pretty , red , sexy , shot , studio , style , vertical , white , woman , women , young , emotion , expression , head , health , clothes , clothing , collage , collection , display , dress

Very busy in class with al the training.

Very busy in class with al the training.

ballet, girl, toddler, dancer, child, ballerina, tutu, cute, small, isolated, human, pupil, model, fun, preschool, white, sweet, studio, pettiest, people, dance, caucasian, female, fashion, smiling, love, portrait, dress, pink, petty, young, standing, face, adorable, skirt, person, beauty, innocent, kid, elegance, cheerful, beautiful, background, grace, costume, pretty, little, happy

Posted by Ganna Bird on 2013-12-30 11:34:33

Tagged: , ballet , girl , toddler , dancer , child , ballerina , tutu , cute , small , isolated , human , pupil , model , fun , preschool , white , sweet , studio , pettiest , people , dance , caucasian , female , fashion , smiling , love , portrait , dress , pink , petty , young , standing , face , adorable , skirt , person , beauty , innocent , kid , elegance , cheerful , beautiful , background , grace , costume , pretty , little , happy

Portrait photography or portraiture is a photography of a person or group of people that displays the expression, personality, and mood of the subject.

Portrait photography or portraiture is a photography of a person or group of people that displays the expression, personality, and mood of the subject.

Up The Banner Photography , Noel Moore.

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Images are the property of Up The Banner Photography
and may not be reproduced without permission.

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Portrait photography or portraiture is a photography of a person or group of people that displays the expression, personality, and mood of the subject. Like other types of portraiture, the focus of the photograph is usually the person’s face, although the entire body and the background may be included.

History

Portrait photography has been around since the invention and popularization of the camera. The relatively low cost of the daguerreotype in the middle of the 19th century led to its popularity for portraiture. The style of these early works reflected the technical challenges associated with long exposure times and the painterly aesthetic of the time. Subjects were generally seated against plain backgrounds and lit with the soft light of an overhead window and whatever else could be reflected with mirrors. Advances in photographic equipment and techniques developed, gave photographers the ability to capture images with shorter exposure times and allowed photographers to take portrait outside of a studio.
[edit] Lighting for portraiture
Winter portrait of a 10-month old baby girl

When portrait photographs are composed and captured in a studio, the professional photographer has control over the lighting of the composition of the subject and can adjust direction and intensity. There are many ways to light a subject’s face, but there are several common lighting plans which are easy enough to describe.
[edit] Three-Point Lighting

One of the most basic lighting plans is called three-point lighting. This plan uses three (and sometimes four) lights to fully model (bring out details and the three-dimensionality of) the subject’s features. The three main lights used in this light plan are as follows:
[edit] The Key light

Also called a main light, the key light is usually placed to one side of the subject’s face, between 30 and 60 degrees off center and a bit higher than eye level. The key light is the brightest light in the lighting plan.
[edit] The Fill light

Placed opposite the key light, the fill light fills in or softens the shadows on the opposite side of the face. The brightness of the fill light is usually between 1/3 and 1/4 that of the key light. This is expressed as a ratio as in 3:1 or 4:1. When the ratio is 3:1 this is sometimes called Kodak lighting since this was the ratio suggested by Kodak in the instructional booklets accompanying the company’s early cameras.

The purpose of these two lights is to mimic the natural light created by placing a subject in a room near a window. The daylight falling on the subject through the window is the Key light and the Fill light is reflected light coming from the walls of the room. This type of lighting can be found in the works of hundreds of classical painters and early photographers and is often called Rembrandt lighting.
[edit] The Back light

Also called a rim light or hair light, the rim light (the third main light in the three-point lighting plan) is placed behind the subject, out of the picture frame, and often rather higher than the Key light or Fill. The point of the rim light is to provide separation from the background by highlighting the subject’s shoulders and hair. The rim light should be just bright enough to provide separation from the background, but not as bright as the key light.

Sometimes the rim light is set just off to the side, on the fill light side. This can add edge detail to the shadowed side of your model’s face. This can add the effect of having a kicker light using only the three basis lights of three point lighting.
[edit] The Kicker

The "fourth light" in three point lighting, a kicker is a small light, often heavily gobo-ed, snooted or barn doored to limit its coverage, that adds a bright edge light on the fill light side of your model’s face. The placement and brightness of a kicker is a matter of taste and technique. A kicker can also a light used to kick start another light.
[edit] Butterfly lighting

Butterfly lighting uses only two lights. The Key light is placed directly in front of the subject, often above the camera or slightly to one side, and a bit higher than is common for a three-point lighting plan. The second light is a rim light. Often a reflector is placed below the subject’s face to provide fill light and soften shadows.

This lighting can be recognized by the strong light falling on the forehead, the bridge of the nose and the upper cheeks, and by the distinct shadow below the nose which often looks rather like a butterfly and thus provides the name for this lighting plan. Butterfly lighting was a favourite of famed Hollywood portraitist George Hurrell which is why this style of lighting is often called Paramount lighting.
[edit] Accessory lights

These lights can be added to basic lighting plans to provide additional highlights or add background definition.
[edit] The Kicker

A kicker is a small light, often made directional through the use of a snoot, umbrella, or softbox. The kicker is designed to add highlights to the off side of the subject’s face, usually just enough to establish the jaw line or edge of an ear. The kicker should thus be a bit brighter than the fill light, but not so bright it over fills the off side of the face. Many portraitists choose not to use a kicker and settle for the three main lights of the standard plans.
[edit] Background lights

Not so much a part of the portrait lighting plan, but rather designed to provide illumination for the background behind the subject, background lights can pick out details in the background, provide a halo effect by illuminating a portion of a backdrop behind the subject’s head, or turn the background pure white by filling it with light.
[edit] Other lighting equipment

Most lights used in modern photography are a flash of some sort. The lighting for portraiture is typically diffused by bouncing it from the inside of an umbrella, or by using a soft box. A soft box is a fabric box, encasing a photo strobe head, one side of which is made of translucent fabric. This provides a softer lighting for portrait work and is often considered more appealing than the harsh light often cast by open strobes. Hair and background lights are usually not diffused. It is more important to control light spillage to other areas of the subject. Snoots, barn doors and flags or gobos help focus the lights exactly where the photographer wants them. Background lights are sometimes used with color gels placed in front of the light to create coloured backgrounds.
[edit] Windowlight Portraiture
Window light used to create soft light to the portrait

Windows as a source of light for portraits have been used for decades before artificial sources of light were discovered. According to Arthur Hammond, amateur and professional photographers need only two things to light a portrait: a window and a reflector.[1] Although window light limits options in portrait photography compared to artificial lights it gives ample room for experimentation for amateur photographers. A white reflector placed to reflect light into the darker side of the subject’s face, will even the contrast. Shutter speeds may be slower than normal, requiring the use of a tripod, but the lighting will be beautifully soft and rich.[2]

The best time to take window light portrait is considered to be early hours of the day and late hours of afternoon when light is more intense on the window. Curtains, reflectors, and intensity reducing shields are used to give soft light. While mirrors and glasses can be used for high key lighting. At times colored glasses, filters and reflecting objects can be used to give the portrait desired color effects. The composition of shadows and soft light gives window light portraits a distinct effect different from portraits made from artificial lights.

While using window light, the positioning of the camera can be changed to give the desired effects. Such as positioning the camera behind the subject can produce a silhouette of the individual while being adjacent to the subject give a combination of shadows and soft light. And facing the subject from the same point of light source will produce high key effects with least shadows.
[edit] Styles of portraiture

There are many different techniques for portrait photography. Often it is desirable to capture the subject’s eyes and face in sharp focus while allowing other less important elements to be rendered in a soft focus. At other times, portraits of individual features might be the focus of a composition such as the hands, eyes or part of the subject’s torso.

Additionally another style such as head shot has came out of the portraiture technique and had become a style on its own.
[edit] Approaches to Portraiture

There are essentially four approaches that can be taken in photographic portraiture — the constructionist, environmental, candid and creative approaches. Each approach has been used over time for different reasons be they technical, artistic or cultural. The constructionist approach is when the photographer in their portraiture constructs an idea around the portrait — happy family, romantic couple, trustworthy executive. It is the approach used in most studio and social photography. It is also used extensively in advertising and marketing when an idea has to be put across. The environmental approach depicts the subject in their environment be that a work, leisure, social or family one. They are often shown as doing something, a teacher in a classroom, an artist in a studio, a child in a playground. With the environmental approach more is revealed about the subject. Environmental pictures can have good historical and social significance as primary sources of information. The candid approach is where people are photographed without their knowledge going about their daily business. Whilst this approach taken by the paparazzi is criticized and frowned upon for obvious reasons, less invasive and exploitative candid photography has given the world superb and important images of people in various situations and places over the last century. The images of Parisians by Doisneau and Cartier-Bresson to name but two, demonstrate this. As with environmental photography, candid photography is important as a historical source of information about people. The Creative Approach is where digital manipulation (and formerly darkroom manipulation) is brought to bear to produce wonderful pictures of people. It is becoming a major form of portraiture as these techniques become more widely understood and used.
[edit] Lenses

Lenses used in portrait photography are classically fast, medium telephoto lenses, though any lens may be used, depending on artistic purposes. See Canon EF Portrait Lenses for Canon lenses in this style; other manufacturers feature similar ranges. The first dedicated portrait lens was the Petzval lens developed in 1840 by Joseph Petzval. It had a relatively narrow field of view of 30 degrees, a focal length of 150mm, and a fast f-number in the f/3.3-3.7 range.

Classic focal length is in the range 80–135mm on 135 film format and about 150-400mm on large format, which historically is first in photography. Such a field of view provides a flattering perspective distortion when the subject is framed to include their head and shoulders. Wider angle lenses (shorter focal length) require that the portrait be taken from closer (for an equivalent field size), and the resulting perspective distortion yields a relatively larger nose and smaller ears, which is considered unflattering and imp-like. Wide-angle lenses – or even fisheye lenses – may be used for artistic effect, especially to produce a grotesque image. Conversely, longer focal lengths yield greater flattening because they are used from further away. This makes communication difficult and reduces rapport. They may be used, however, particularly in fashion photography, but longer lengths require a loudspeaker or walkie-talkie to communicate with the model or assistants.[3] In this range, the difference in perspective distortion between 85mm and 135mm is rather subtle; see (Castleman 2007) for examples and analysis.

Speed-wise, fast lenses (wide aperture) are preferred, as these allow shallow depth of field (blurring the background), which helps isolate the subject from the background and focus attention on them. This is particularly useful in the field, where one does not have a back drop behind the subject, and the background may be distracting. The details of bokeh in the resulting blur are accordingly also a consideration. However, extremely wide apertures are less frequently used, because they have a very shallow depth of field and thus the subject’s face will not be completely in focus.[4] Thus, f/1.8 or f/2 is usually the maximum aperture used; f/1.2 or f/1.4 may be used, but the resulting defocus may be considered a special effect – the eyes will be sharp, but the ears and nose will be soft.

Conversely, in environmental portraits, where the subject is shown in their environment, rather than isolated from it, background blur is less desirable and may be undesirable, and wider angle lenses may be used to show more context.[5]

Finally, soft focus (spherical aberration) is sometimes a desired effect, particularly in glamour photography where the "gauzy" look may be considered flattering. The Canon EF 135mm f/2.8 with Softfocus is an example of a lens designed with a controllable amount of soft focus.

Most often a prime lens will be used, both because the zoom is not necessary for posed shots (and primes are lighter, cheaper, faster, and higher quality), and because zoom lenses can introduce highly unflattering geometric distortion (barrel distortion or pincushion distortion). However, zoom lenses may be used, particularly in candid shots or to encourage creative framing.[6]

Portrait lenses are often relatively inexpensive, because they can be built simply, and are close to the normal range. The cheapest portrait lenses are normal lenses (50mm), used on a cropped sensor. For example, the Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II is the least expensive Canon lens, but when used on a 1.6× cropped sensor yields an 80mm equivalent focal length, which is at the wide end of portrait lenses.

Posted by upthebanner on 2012-04-09 11:19:56

Tagged: , adult , attractive , background , beautiful , beauty , black , brown , caucasian , cute , elegance , elegant , face , fashion , female , fun , girl , glamour , green , hair , hand , happy , healthy , hot , human , isolated , lady , long , looking , makeup , model , mouth , nails , natural , one , only , people , person , portrait , posing , pretty , red , sexy , shot , studio , style , vertical , white , woman , women , young , emotion , expression , head , health , clothes , clothing , collage , collection , display , dress

ELIE SAAB (Official Runway Photos) – Paris Prêt à Porter / Paris Fashion Week AW14 Autumn Winter 2014 – #PFW – March 3, 2014 – Photos distributed by Mainstream, via Gwenn Decca at Elie Saab

ELIE SAAB (Official Runway Photos) – Paris Prêt à Porter / Paris Fashion Week AW14 Autumn Winter 2014 – #PFW – March 3, 2014 – Photos distributed by Mainstream, via Gwenn Decca at Elie Saab

███████████████████████████████████

Elie Saab at Paris Fashion Week
Official Runway Photos

████████████ DESIGNER

Elie Saab was born in Beirut, Lebanon, on July 4th 1964. He was only six years old, when he first showed signs of his future flair, designing clothes while other children played. His parents thought he might become a tailor.
In 1981 he went to Paris, intending to study fashion, but was impatient to get started on making clothes. So he returned to Beirut and set up his own workshop in 1982.
His atelier started right from the beginning to make evening gowns and wedding dresses. His clothes were a mixture of Oriental and Western styles.
During the 1980’s, his collections attracted many clients, including Princesses and his reputation built up.
His signature style of making garments using rich fabrics, lace, detailed embroidery, pearls, crystals and silk threads, put Saab in a league of his own.
By 1986 orders were pouring in and jet setters and high rollers were after his creations. During the 1990’s, he took a bigger atelier and started fulfilling orders from Paris and Switzerland.
In 1997 Saab was the first non-Italian designer to become a member of the Italian Camera Nazionale della Moda, and so in 1997, Elie showed his first collection outside Lebanon, which was in Rome.
In 1998, he started ready-to-wear in Milan. In the same year, he held his fashion show in Monaco, attended by Princess Stephanie.
His evening gowns are very renowned for their elegance. He always shows at least ten wedding gowns with every collection. Nowadays, he dresses many Hollywood film stars and attractive American women.
He became particularly well-known in early 2002, when Halle Berry wore his red gown to receive her Oscar Award. She was the first black woman recipient of an Oscar, and Saab was the first Lebanese designer to dress an Oscar winner.
In May 2003, the Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture invited him to become a member, and he showed his first haute couture collection in Paris in July 2003. His first ready-to-wear collection in Paris was the Spring-Summer 2006 collection, and Paris is now his permanent ready-to-wear runway.
Saab has his headquarters in Beirut, with offices in New York and Paris. His ready-to-wear line is made in Italy. He has 60 retail outlets all over the world, 18 of them in the United States.
He is now preparing to move into his own new multi-story building in the Beirut Central District, which should be completed soon.

Saab’s collections are glamorous and sophisticated, fusing a cultural myriad of fashion influences to give a distinctive and modern edge to his designs. He experiments with the central themes of femininity and romanticism, creating clothing that is cut-to-the-curve, with soft edges and exquisite detail including hand embroidery, beading and the use of luxurious fabrics such as mousseline and silk.

eliesaab.com
twitter.com/ElieSaabWorld

████████████ EVENT

Paris Fashion Week

The Fédération Française de la Couture, du Prêt-à-Porter des Couturiers et des Créateurs de Mode was founded in 1973.

The association began as the Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture, which dates to 1868. The Fédération’s headquarters have been located at 100 rue du Faubourg Saint Honoré, Paris 8e, since 1935.

The Fédération is the executive body for each of the specific Chambres Syndicales, or industry-specific associations, which constitute its membership. Elected president Didier Grumbach runs it. Mr. Grumbach, entrusted with the industry’s confidence, works to define and implement measures that will help the French fashion industry grow.

The Chambre Syndicale du Prêt-à-Porter des Couturiers et des Créateurs de Mode

This association, created in 1973, is presided over by Ralph Toledano (JeanPaul Gaultier). It is made up of Haute Couture houses and fashion designers who produce women’s ready-to-wear.

A unique quality of the The Fédération Française de la Couture, du Prêt-à-Porter des Couturiers et des Créateurs de Mode is that its membership includes non-French companies from countries including Japan, Italy, Belgium, etc.

This mix reflects the growing globalization of fashion.

modeaparis.com

████████████ PUBLICITY

PR by
Gwenn Decca
ELIE SAAB
eliesaab.om
twitter.com/ElieSaabWorld

████████████ Mainstre.am

Mainstream makes images available to the independent press, the mainstream press, open media such as Flickr, Creative Commons, and Wikipedia.

We will soon launch with a service for content creators, publicists, and publishers around the world.

mainstre.am

████████████ Contact

Questions can be sent to:

Tamara McCartney (Fashion Editorial Assistant)
twitter.com/tamaramccartney

and

Jason Hargrove (Founder)
twitter.com/jasonhargrove
jasonhargrove.com

Posted by goMainstream on 2014-03-04 13:57:50

Tagged: , ELIE SAAB , AW 14 , AUTUMN WINTER , AUTUMN WINTER 2014 , Ready To Wear , RTW 14 , RTW , RUNWAY , CATWALK , Catlwalk , FASHION , FASHION WEEK , FASHIONABLE , Fall Winter 2014 , FALL WINTER , FW , PARIS FASHION WEEK , PARIS , MODE , FEMME , MODELS , Automne Hiver , AUTOMNE HIVER 2014

JOE FRESH (Official Runway Photos by George Pimentel) – World Mastercard Fashion Week Toronto SS14 Spring Summer 2014 – #WMCFW – October 23, 2013 – Photos distributed by Mainstream, via WMCFW Toronto

JOE FRESH (Official Runway Photos by George Pimentel) – World Mastercard Fashion Week Toronto SS14 Spring Summer 2014 – #WMCFW – October 23, 2013 – Photos distributed by Mainstream, via WMCFW Toronto

██████████████████████████████████

Joe Fresh at World Mastercard Fashion Week
Official Runway Photos

████████████ DESIGNER

For more than 25 years, Joseph Mimram has been an important contributor to the fashion and design industry in Canada. With his sharp eye, impeccable attention to detail and insight into emerging trends, Joe has always been on the forefront of what’s next.
As creative director of the Joe Fresh® brand, Joe is committed to offering women, men and children stylish and versatile looks for every day that are both well-designed and well-priced. Joe personally oversees the design and development of an extensive clothing range, from chic footwear to the latest in outdoor fashions. In addition to apparel, the Joe Fresh ™ brand recently launched cosmetics and bath collections.
Joe is intrinsically involved in every step of the Joe Fresh® creative process from product design to marketing, finding the right model for an advertising campaign to selecting a store location and design. As focused as he is on the design process, Joe also fully understands the business aspect of retail and has led Joe Fresh® to become one of the top brands in Canada, with 330+ stores in Canada and into international expansion.
Joe’s illustrious career began in 1977 within his family’s dress design and manufacturing business. He astutely identified the need for careerwear for women as they entered the work force and this forward-thinking resulted in the development of several successful brands starting with Alfred Sung. Shortly thereafter he founded Club Monaco and later launched Caban.
With his current company, Joseph Mimran & Accessories, he continues to keep his finger on the pulse, providing elegant design, inventive product development and branding expertise for the apparel, home and entertainment divisions of Loblaw Companies Limited. Joe also currently contributes to the Pink Tartan line of clothing, a luxury sportswear collection designed by his wife Kimberley Newport-Mimran and serves as chair of the Fashion Design Council of Canada.

joefresh.com
twitter.com/JoeFresh

████████████ EVENT

World Mastercard Fashion Week

As the nation’s leading fashion event, World MasterCard Fashion Week focuses on propelling Canadian designers to the forefront of the global fashion arena. Established and emerging designers take the stage in front of an audience made up of international media and industry professionals to debut their newest collections. Serving as an anchor, this twice annual event provides a physical platform to a year-round road map. Beyond the shows, World MasterCard Fashion Week is the nexus of style, culture, entertainment and beyond in Toronto. Capturing the international sensibility of the city (and its residents) as well as curating a calendar of social activities where runway meets retail and influencers can celebrate the diversity of this happening metropolis.

worldmastercardfashionweek.com
twitter.com/WMCFashionWeek

████████████ PHOTOGRAPHY

Photos by
George Pimentel
pimentelphoto.com
jcpimentel.com/index.html

████████████ PUBLICITY

Photos courtesy of
World Mastercard Fashion Week
worlmastercardfashionweek.com
twitter.com/WMCFashionWeek

████████████ Mainstre.am

Mainstream makes images available to the independent press, the mainstream press, open media such as Flickr, Creative Commons, and Wikipedia.

We will soon launch with a service for content creators, publicists, and publishers around the world.

mainstre.am

████████████ Contact

Questions can be sent to:

Tamara McCartney (Assistant Producer)
twitter.com/tamaramccartney

and

Jason Hargrove (Founder)
twitter.com/jasonhargrove
jasonhargrove.com

Posted by goMainstream on 2013-10-24 21:20:05

Tagged: , Joe , Fresh , Joe_Fresh , WMCFW , SS14 , RUNWAY , CATWALK , FASHION , TORONTO , Ready To Wear , RTW , RTW 14 , clothes , clothing , models , canada , WorldMasterCardFashionWeek , Mastercard , Fashionable , WOMEN , MEN , MODEL , SPRING SUMMER 2014